Safe Cleaning the Windows XP registry


"Say goodbye to frequent Windows freezes and restarts. Faster boot ups and more productivity with a faster accelerated system. Get PC Booster Now!

The Windows XP registry is one of the most important components of your PC. Your Windows XP settings are stored in the operating system's registry. So if you want to safeguard your settings, you must learn how to protect the registry's contents. For that matter, if you want to tweak the operating system using the registry, make doubly sure that you've left a way to get out of any trouble you might cause through overly-enthusiastic hacking. This is for all you Windows XP enthusiasts who edit the registry using the Registry Editor (Regedit).




Click the "Start" menu button to open the Start menu.
Click "Run."
Type "regedit" into the text field and press "Enter."
Access the many different entries in your Windows XP registry. It is separated into primary sections: HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT, HKEY_CURRENT_USER, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, HKEY_USERS and HKEY_CURRENT CONFIG. Each section contains a different set of entries related to different aspects of Windows XP operation.
Click on one of the plus-signs (+) next to one of the root directories, opening a more detailed list. This second level will have more directories to choose from, and will make it easier for you to find entries you need to clean the registry.
Delete entries in the registry that you know are either causing conflicts or are no longer necessary. Do this by pressing the "Delete" key, or by right-clicking on your mouse and choosing "Delete entry."
Invest in a third-party registry application to help you clean your Windows XP registry. Several programs are available that do the dirty work for you. Some even include backup capabilities to retrace their steps in the event of a critical error.
Clean your boot records by changing which programs load themselves at startup. Click through both the LOCAL_MACHINE and CURRENT_USER directories until you reach Software/Microsoft/Windows/Run and RunOnce. From here, you can clean out registry entries that are causing certain programs to run on startup.



Three Practices to Safe Hacking Windows Registry



Here, you'll learn 3 methods for protecting the registry before you edit it. If you use any one of these methods, you'll almost never make a change that you can't restore. Keep in mind that I use these methods to back up specific branches of the registry while working in those branches. I don't use them to back up the entire registry. System Restore takes care of that for you, so you don't have to manually back up the whole thing.




Leave original data a manual backup before removing them immediately.



Rename the original value to something like Initials_ Name, where Initials is your initials, and Name is the value's original name.
Add a date if you think you're going to change the value often.
Add a new value using the original name and type but with new data. You're all set to change the value and if you don't like the result, you can restore the original value with little effort.
Export the part of the registry in which you're working to a REG file.
Import the REG file to restore the original settings. I'm not as keen on this method as the next method I describe, since importing a REG file in to the registry doesn't always restore keys to their original states (importing a REG file doesn't remove settings from the registry that you've added since creating the REG file). This is an acceptable option for real quick backup copies of individual values, however, since you can edit REG files to remove values that you don't want to restore.




Export branches to hive files.
Hive files are better than REG files for backing up the registry. When you restore a hive file containing a key, the Registry Editor completely replaces the current key and all of its subkeys with the contents of the hive file. Exporting branches to hive files is similar to exporting them to REG files; you just pick a different file type:

Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and click OK.
On the File menu, click Export.
In the Save as type list, click Registry Hive Files.
Type the name of the new hive file, and then click Save.
Reverse the process to restore your settings:
In the Registry Editor, click File, click Import, click Registry Hive Files in the Save as type list, type the name of the hive file to which you backed up your settings, and then click Open. You can use any file extension you like, but I prefer to give hive files the .dat extension. The .hiv extension is also common for hive files.

Learn more: ABOUT THE SECRETS OF COMPUTER HERETHE THREE BASIC STEPS AND GUIDES TO TOTAL AND COMPLETE PC OPTIMIZATION ARE:

1. KNOW ALL THE PC SECRETS AND STOP BEING CONFUSED WITH YOUR PC, DOWNLOAD THE PACK HERE .

2. GET FOR YOURSELF THE SIMPLE FIX GUIDE FROM HERE FOR ALL PC PROBLEMS AND STOP BEING FRUSTRATED WITH PC PROBLEMS.

3. THEN SPEED UP THE PC USING THIS GUIDE .
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Windows Registry Repair - Detailed tutorial to fix registry


Detailed tutorial to fix windows registry, backup windows registry and recover from corruption of windows registry

"Say goodbye to frequent Windows freezes and restarts. Faster boot ups and more productivity with a faster accelerated system. Get PC Booster Now!

This detailed tutorial describes when to repair Windows Registry, how to edit and repair the Windows Registry and how to recover from a corruption Windows Registry. Microsoft recommends that before you ever edit the Registry, you always attempt to back up the Registry and understand how to restore it if a problem occurs.



When to repair Windows Registry?<p>

A few symptoms you should recognize as signs of a cluttered registry and probably in need of repair and optimization:
An extremely slowed down system every time you start your computer
Repeated system crashes which happen at high performance times
Frequent error messages even when you do not run many programs or doing something to the system
Frequent and unexplained system freezes
The Ultimate blue screen of death that says Beginning of Physical Memory Dump
Inability to add or remove a software in your computer
Extremely slow response to instructions
Slow startups and shutdowns
Frequent rebooting required



How to edit & repair Windows Registry?



Windows Registry is the nervous system so If it's damaged, it's a good bet that Windows is going to start to experience critical errors and ruin your day for sure. With a solid backup in place, you don't need to worry so much about making a mistake making changes. Its good to be careful, but at least you're covered if you make a mistake. It's so simple to backup the Registry; there is no way you can blow it!




First, you should know that your Windows XP system is covered under System Restore. Make sure you are logged on as the Administrator or at least have Administrative privileges to the XP system.



Start => all Programs => Accessories => System Tools => System Restore



Walk through System Restore and make a backup.




Next, remember that changes only take place once you reboot the system. When you do (after you make your Registry Hacks), that's when you will see the fireworks¡­ or should I say ¨C the infamous BSOD?




Exporting the Registry. You can export the registry in hives or you can export the whole thing. Either way, it all depends on the type of change you are making or if you think you will be able to recover from it or not enough to get it repaired. This is a quick way to backup the Registry but not perfect, System Restore is your best bet.




Open the Registry Editor (Start => Run => Regedit).
Go to File => Import or Export.
If you Export, you can save this to a Registry file (*.reg)




If you were going to make a change to one key, make the duplicate key and rename it this way if you need to come back to the original setting, you have it there, if you just delete the key, you may have to reference another machine and if it's an application specific setting, you may not be able to recover from it if you don't have the install disks for it anymore. It happens.




If these all fail or if you're planning on major surgery in your Registry, you should seriously consider using System Restore. This is the best option for XP only if XP will no longer boot. If that's the case, then you will need to rely on the Automated System Recovery and Recovery Console.



How to recover from a corruption Windows Registry?



Windows XP system might fail to start because of corruption in the registry. The following procedure lists a few manual steps using Recovery Console and System Restore to recover a corrupted registry that prevents Windows XP from starting. It does not guarantee full recovery of the system to a previous state; however, you should be able to recover data when you use this procedure.



Part one:



In part one, you start the Recovery Console, create a temporary folder, back up the existing registry files to a new location, delete the registry files at their existing location, and then copy the registry files from the repair folder to the System32\Config folder. When you have finished this procedure, a registry is created that you can use to start Windows XP. This registry was created and saved during the initial setup of Windows XP. Therefore any changes and settings that occurred after the Setup program was finished are lost.

To complete part one, follow these steps:




Insert the Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.
Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted to do so.
When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
When you are prompted to do so, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.
At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:



md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default
copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer will restart.




Note: This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location. If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step five, and then create a text file called "regcopy1.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
With the batch command in Recovery Console, you can process all the commands in a text file sequentially. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.



Part two:



To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group).

If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you must log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. (Click here to learn how to start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode.)



In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is generally not visible during typical usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:

Start Windows Explorer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder options.
Click the View tab.
Under Hidden files and folders, click to select Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.
Click Yes when the dialog box that confirms that you want to display these files appears.
Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to display a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.
Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder is unavailable and appears dimmed because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

Note This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".




Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RPx under this folder. These are restore points.




Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder: C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot



From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:

_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
Rename the files in the C:\Windows\Tmp folder as follows:

Rename _REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT to DEFAULT
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY to SECURITY
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE to SOFTWARE
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM to SYSTEM
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM to SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file that the Setup program created, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUIDE under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. Therefore, it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.



The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You must have a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.



The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to make sure that the files are available under Recovery Console. You must use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. By default, Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder.



Part Three:



In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Start Recovery Console.
At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:

del c:\windows\system32\config\sam
del c:\windows\system32\config\security
del c:\windows\system32\config\software
del c:\windows\system32\config\default
del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\tmp\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\tmp\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\tmp\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\tmp\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer restarts.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location. If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy2.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy2.txt



Part Four:




Click Start, and then click All Programs.
Click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
Click System Restore, and then click Restore to a previous RestorePoint.

Learn more: ABOUT THE SECRETS OF COMPUTER HERE
THE THREE BASIC STEPS AND GUIDES TO TOTAL AND COMPLETE PC OPTIMIZATION ARE:

1. KNOW ALL THE PC SECRETS AND STOP BEING CONFUSED WITH YOUR PC, DOWNLOAD THE PACK HERE .

2. GET FOR YOURSELF THE SIMPLE FIX GUIDE FROM HERE FOR ALL PC PROBLEMS AND STOP BEING FRUSTRATED WITH PC PROBLEMS.

3. THEN SPEED UP THE PC USING THIS GUIDE .




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The software and Hardware Reasons Why Windows Crashes


Why does Windows crash? Check out these following software issues & hardware issues.



"Say goodbye to frequent Windows freezes and restarts. Faster boot ups and more productivity with a faster accelerated system."Get The Pc Fix Guide


Windows XP and Windows 2000 are both supposed to be (and typically are) much more stable than Windows 9x/Me, but there are still things that can bring down the entire system in a heartbeat, displaying the BSD (Blue Screen of Death) or simply restarting. If you're lucky, it only ruins your day. More than likely, you're in for several bad days followed by a few stressful weeks or months. After all, systems rarely fail only once. Rather, they keep crashing until you find the cause and fix the problem. Go over this checklist and see if any of these apply to you.




Why does Windows crash? Software issues.
To date, Windows has been used most commonly on the x86 processor. The x86 implements a protection mechanism that lets multiple programs run simultaneously without stepping on each other's toes. This protection comes in four levels of privilege or access to system memory and hardware. Two of these levels are commonly referred to as kernel mode and user mode.



Kernel mode is the most privileged state of the x86. Both the Windows OS and drivers are considered trusted, and, therefore, run in kernel mode. This ensures unfettered access to system resources and the ability to maximize performance. Other software is assigned to user mode, the least-privileged state of the x86, restricting direct access to much of the system. Applications, such as Microsoft Word, run in user mode to guard against applications corrupting system-level software and each other.



Although kernel-mode software is protected from applications running in user mode, it is not protected from other kernel-mode software. For example, if a driver erroneously accesses a portion of memory that is being used by other software (or not specifically marked as accessible to drivers), Windows stops the entire system. This is called a bug check or a crash, and Windows displays the popularly known Blue Screen of Death (BSOD). About 95% of Windows system crashes are caused by buggy software (or buggy device drivers), almost all of which come from third-party vendors. The remaining 5% is due to malfunctioning hardware devices, which often prompt crashes by corrupting memory contents.



Another little-known fact is that most crashes are repeat crashes. Few administrators can resolve system crashes immediately. As a result, they typically happen again and again. It's common to see weeks and months pass before the answer is found. By solving a crash immediately after the first occurrence, you can prevent time-consuming and costly repeat crashes.




Why does Windows crash? Hardware issues.
Power Supply
A bad (or insufficient) power supply is the most common cause for random crashes, especially if you have a lot of cards, drives, or fans, or have a dual-processor motherboard. A 350W or 400W power supply is recommended if you're experiencing this problem.




A mix of FAT32 and NTFS drives
If you have more than one hard disk, and there are different file systems on each one, try converting them all to NTFS.




Audio Card Drivers
Try removing your sound card, or at least uninstalling and then reinstalling the drivers.




USB Hub
If you have a USB hub, try eliminating it and see if that solves the problem (especially if you have a USB-based Palm cradle and your system crashes every time you hotsync).




Overheating
A computer will crash if the processor overheats. Make sure the CPU fan/fans are working, and that the processor temperature (read in the BIOS screen) is within normal limits. Make sure your computer case has adequate ventilation.




Bad memory
A bad memory module can cause this problem. Try removing one of the modules (if applicable) to see if that solves the problem; rotate through all modules until you've found the culprit. Note that some computers require memory to be installed in pairs, so, for example, if you have four modules, you'll have to remove two (no more, no fewer) for this test.




Note: these things aren't necessarily problems in and of themselves, so if you're not experiencing random crashes, don't waste your time solving problems that aren't there.



Learn more: ABOUT THE SECRETS OF COMPUTER HERE

THE THREE BASIC STEPS AND GUIDES TO TOTAL AND COMPLETE PC OPTIMIZATION ARE:
1. KNOW ALL THE PC SECRETS AND STOP BEING CONFUSED WITH YOUR PC, DOWNLOAD THE PACK HERE .


2. GET FOR YOURSELF THE SIMPLE FIX GUIDE FROM HERE FOR ALL PC PROBLEMS AND STOP BEING FRUTRATED WITH PC PROBLEMS.


3. THEN SPEED UP THE PC USING THIS GUIDE .

Speed up slow PC - Squeeze every last drop of performance out of your XP ...Duncan Kredion

With faster machines cropping up almost daily, the life span of a midrange PC is a little more than two years of service. Physically, the computer you bought a few years ago is just as sound as any new piece of hardware. Ideally, it could probably last you a decade or two--as long as you didn't add any new software or surf the Net. Realistically, that's not likely to be the case.



Instead of buying a new computer, optimize your present one. The following are 11 things that Chip Manufacturers and PC Retailers don't want you to know or how to perform. Following these advices will drastically increase your PC performance and help you regain your sanity while saving loads of money. And, if your PC is years old and can't afford to upgrade yet, you will be able to squeeze out some more juice out of the old thing!


1. Disable file indexing. This is a tiny service that uses a great deal of RAM and induces much disk thrashing. Your system instantly becomes more responsive. Here's how: First, doubleclick the My Computer icon. Then, right-click on the C: Drive, then hit Properties. Uncheck "Allow Indexing Service to index this disk for fast file searching." Next, apply changes to "C: subfolders and files," and click OK.



2. Zap the Windows Prefetch folder every week. Windows XP can "prefetch" portions of data and applications that are frequently loaded. This allows processes appear to start faster when requested the user. Over time, the prefetch folder overwhelms with references to files and applications no longer in use. Guess what happens? Windows XP wastes time and grinds to a halt by pre-loading obsolete data. It helps you gain some performance on your XP Professional to periodically empty the prefetch folder.

The prefetch folder resides on your local hard disk, under the Windows folder.
%systemroot%\prefetch
-or-
X:\windows\prefetch


Where X is the drive letter where you have Windows installed. Either path will get you to your local system. The second path is for those who have the default installation on the most commonly used drive letter, C:\



3. Optimise Display Settings. Windows XP can look sexy but displaying all the visual items can waste system resources. Kill unnecessary animations, and nix active desktop. Here's how to do it:
1) Go to Start
2) Click Settings
3) Click Control Panel
4) Click System
5) Click Advanced tab
6) In the Performance tab click Settings
7) Leave only the following ticked:
(1) Show shadows under menus
(2) Show shadows under mouse pointer
(3) Show translucent selection rectangle
(4) Use drop shadows for icons labels on the desktop
(5) Use visual styles on windows and buttons
Feel free to play around with the options offered here, as nothing you can change will alter the stability of the computer - only its responsiveness.



4. Remove the Desktop Picture Your desktop background consumes a fair amount of memory and can slow the loading time of your system. Removing it will improve performance.
1) Right click on Desktop and select Properties
2) Select the Desktop tab
3) In the Background window select None
4) Click Ok




5. Remove Fonts for Speed Zap extra fonts fonts installed on their computer. Fonts, especially TrueType fonts, use quite a bit of system resources. The more fonts they have, the more lethargic the system will become. Anything over 300 fonts tax the system and slow down load times- especially graphic apps. For optimal performance, trim your fonts down to just those that you need to use on a daily basis and fonts that applications may require.
1) Open Control Panel
2) Open Fonts folder
3) Move fonts you don't need to a temporary directory (e.g. C:\FONTBKUP?) just in case you need or want to bring a few of them back. The more fonts you uninstall, the more system resources you will gain.



6. Speedup Folder Browsing You may have noticed that everytime you open my computer to browse folders that there is a slight delay. This is because Windows XP automatically searches for network files and printers everytime you open Windows Explorer. To fix this and to increase browsing significantly:
1) Open My Computer
2) Click on Tools menu
3) Click on Folder Options
4) Click on the View tab.
5) Uncheck the Automatically search for network folders and printers check box
6) Click Apply
7) Click Ok
8) Reboot your computer
To prevent a single Windows Explorer window tanking up takes the rest of your OS down, you can launch separate folder windows in multi processes. Open My Computer, hit on Tools, then Folder Options. Click on the View tab. Scroll down to "Launch folder windows in a separate process," and enable this option.



7. Disable Performance Counters Windows XP has a performance monitor utility which monitors several areas of your PC's performance. These utilities take up system resources so disabling is a good idea. To disable:
1) download and install the Extensible Performance Counter List
2) Then select each counter in turn in the 'Extensible performance counters' window and clear the 'performance counters enabled' checkbox at the bottom button below



8. Optimise Your Pagefile Windows XP sizes the page file to about 1.5X the amount of actual physical memory by default. While this is good for systems with smaller amounts of memory (under 512MB) it is unlikely that a typical XP desktop system will ever need 1.5 X 512MB or more of virtual memory. If you have less than 512MB of memory, leave the page file at its default size. If you have 512MB or more, change the ratio to 1:1 page file size to physical memory size.
1) Right click on My Computer and select Properties
2) Select the Advanced tab
3) Under Performance choose the Settings button
4) Select the Advanced tab again and under Virtual Memory select Change
5) Highlight the drive containing your page file and make the initial Size of the file the same as the Maximum Size of the file.



9. Improve Memory Usage PC Washer improves the performance of your computer by optimizing the disk cache, memory and a number of other settings.

Once Installed:
1) Click the 'Tools' from the left menu
2) Select 'Memory Booster' in the tools list. A new window named 'PC Turbo Memory' will popup.
3) Click Defragment button in the new window.
4) Exit the program. That's all.




10. Disable unnecessary services Windows XP loads services you will never need. To determine which services you can disable for your client, visit the Black Viper site for ideal Windows XP configurations. Here are a few services I booted off to streamline my PC:
* Alerter
* Background Intelligent Transfer Service
* ClipBook
* Computer Browser
* Error Reporting Service
* Help and Support
* Indexing Service
* IPSEC Services
* Messenger
* NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing
* Network DDE
* Network DDE DSDM
* Performance Logs and Alerts
* Portable Media Serial Number
* QOS RSVP
* Help Session Manager
* Remote Registry
* Secondary Logon
* Server
* Smart Card
* Smart Card Helper
* SSDP Discovery Service
* System restore Service
* TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper
* Uninterruptible Power Supply
* Universal Plug and Play Device Host
* WebClient
* Windows time
* Wireless Zero Configuration
* WMI Performance Adapter




11. Disconnect USB devices you aren't using. When Windows starts, it must load all the drivers for the devices connected to your computer. If you have many devices connected to the USB ports, such as printers, scanners, cameras and hard drives that you don't use on a regular basis, disconnect them. You can reconnect them when you use them. Disconnecting them when they are not in use will allow Windows to load the drivers only when needed.



The above steps should help increase the performance of Windows XP as well as keep it running with more stability.

THE THREE BASIC STEPS AND GUIDES TO TOTAL AND COMPLETE PC OPTIMIZATION ARE:

1. KNOW ALL THE PC SECRETS AND STOP BEING CONFUSED WITH YOUR PC, DOWNLOAD THE PACK HERE

2. GET FOR YOURSELF THE SIMPLE FIX GUIDE FROM HERE FOR ALL PC PROBLEMS AND STOP BEING FRUTRATED WITH PC PROBLEMS.

3. THEN SPEED UP THE PC USING THIS GUIDE





How to Speed Up Slow Windows XP - Tips on Speeding Up Windows XP That is Slow...George Tho


If you want to know how to speed up slow Windows XP, there are good news and bad news. The good news is that there are a thousand and one things that you can do with regards to how to speed up slow Windows XP. The bad news is that, the causes of Windows running slow can vary to a huge extent and it is sometimes very hard if not impossible for lay men to find the root of the issue. This article will look at some common causes as well as their solutions.



Too many unnecessary programs installed.



This is a very common issue and people trying to find out how to speed up slow Windows XP should first look at this aspect. Go to the control panel and scroll through the list of programs, chances are you will find some programs that you no longer need. Uninstall these.



Spywares.



With more and more browser tools like toolbars and free software downloads online now, this has become one of the most common causes of Windows slowing down. What happens is that when users install free software or toolbars for their browser, hidden programs may be installed and are kept running every time Windows starts. These take up memory resources. One spyware may not do much but when you have more of them, the effect is quite substantial. Download spyware removal tools like Spybots or Adware to address this issue.



Unwanted files.



Cleaning up unwanted temp files, cookies, downloaded programs from browsing the web will help to address some of the issues on pertaining to how to speed up slow Windows XP. You can use the Windows Disk Cleanup tool to do this. Open My Computer, right-click Local Disk, and then click Properties. On the General tab, click the Disk Cleanup button.



Corrupted or Unwanted Registry Entries



This will also happen over time. With the installing and uninstalling of software and device drivers, the Windows registry accumulates a lot of junk data overtime and this can affect the performance of Windows as it constantly refers to the registry for various tasks. Use a registry cleaner to remove junk entries.

SURVIVING TOOLS FOR SPEEDING UP SLOW PC:
A. Registry Error Fix Doctor here
B. Spyware Remover using this
C. Revealed Computer Secrets Here

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